Evidence That WorkGuru Reduces Levels of Depression, Anxiety and Stress: Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

Most of you who read this blog will know that WorkGuru is an eight-week stress management program that is delivered via the Internet. It uses elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), positive psychology and mindfulness to help reduce feelings of depression, anxiety and stress. People access the self-help program alongside support from an e-coach.

It is really important to us at WorkGuru that we can provide evidence that what we do is effective. In the same way as you would expect the medication that you receive from your doctor to be thoroughly tested and found effective for your health condition, we expect the same rigorous standard to be applied to digital mental health. There has been growing concern amongst researchers that many of the apps available for people experiencing mental health problems do not publish any evidence for their claims which is one reason why we conducted a randomised controlled trial and published the results in a peer review academic journal. Our founder Stephany Carolan led the trial; as well as developing WorkGuru Stephany is also a doctoral researcher at the University of Sussex. Her research interest is how we increase take-up and engagement with digital mental health in the workplace. Continue reading Evidence That WorkGuru Reduces Levels of Depression, Anxiety and Stress: Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

Oh The Fickleness of Research

We love research at WorkGuru, it underpins everything that we do. Just in the same way as medicine that is prescribed by your GP should have a very strong scientific evidence base to say that it works, so should any programme that is delivered over the internet which claims to reduce levels of stress, or increase your wellbeing or happiness. But beware programmes that make huge claims. The ‘brain training’ app Lumosity was recently fined by the Federal Trade Commission for making exuberant claims that brain games could increase intelligence and reduce or delay age related cognitive impairment. The Commission ruled that the claims were unfounded.

Continue reading Oh The Fickleness of Research